I Was Into Atari Before It Was “Retro”, But After It was “Cool”

I Was Into Atari Before It Was “Retro”, But After It was “Cool”

By Fard Muhammad on July 28, 2014  |  Twitter  |  Instagram I was into Atari before it was “retro”, but after it was “cool”. In other words, when it “sucked”. Now, though, it’s considered chic or bemusing to wear old Atari logo shirts and caps as the nostalgia movement is in full force in my […]

Too Powerful for Its Own Good, Atari Lynx Remains A Favorite 25 Years Later

Too Powerful for Its Own Good, Atari Lynx Remains A Favorite 25 Years Later

This is a great article by Jeremy Parish about the Atari Lynx, its impact in the portable wars and its legacy today. The article is well written and touches on all things Atari after Warner Communications sold Atari to Commodore founder Jack Tramiel in a fire sale. What I like most about this article is […]

The 30th Anniversary Of The Death And Birth Of Atari

The 30th Anniversary Of The Death And Birth Of Atari

By Fard Muhammad on July 1, 2014  |  Twitter  |  Instagram On July 2, 1984, Warner Communications, after reeling from Atari, Inc.’s massive losses in 1983, sold the home console and computer divisions of the company to Commodore founder Jack Tramiel’s company called Tramel Technology Limited (or TTL). Upon receiving the assets from Warner, TTL […]

Atari Is Like A Ship With A Hole In The Bottom, Leaking Water, And His Job Is To Get The Ship Pointed In The Right Direction

Atari Is Like A Ship With A Hole In The Bottom, Leaking Water, And His Job Is To Get The Ship Pointed In The Right Direction

By Doctor Octagon on June 11, 2014  |  Opinion His name is Fred Chesnais. Currently he’s CEO and majority shareholder of what we once called Atari and their dozen or so employees that remain on the books. His strategy for making Atari relevant again: “Let other people be Atari” by licensing the name to miscellaneous […]

Back To Borregas Ave: Finding Atari’s Lost World Headquarters

Back To Borregas Ave: Finding Atari’s Lost World Headquarters

In Moffett Park, a partition of land in Sunnyvale, California carved out between Caribbean Drive and Highway 237, lay the remains of what was once home to boundless imagination, creativity and wonder. Once upon a time this was home to the most magical company on Earth. This was home to Atari. The experience of walking around these buildings was surreal. It felt like a dead theme park. While modern companies and tech start-ups breathe new life into old offices, all you see is what once was. Like an old phone booth sitting broken and unused in the parking lot of an abandoned K-Mart. The phone booth had once been a ubiquitous part of daily life that once housed Clark Kent in his transformation into Superman, now it’s obsolete and the world around it has moved on. These are broken pieces of a fallen once-mighty empire. If you squint you can still see it.